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I use a variety of teaching methods to motivate students to learn about politics, including debates, simulations, technology, group projects, lectures, and discussions.”

Bio

My research interests include political psychology, public opinion, Congress, and political communication, and I have publications in Journal of Communication and Political Behavior.

Teaching is very important to me, and the two main pillars of my teaching philosophy are to help students build a foundation of political knowledge and to assist students in developing their critical thinking skills so they may become engaged citizens. I use a variety of teaching methods to motivate students to learn about politics, including debates, simulations, technology, group projects, lectures, and discussions.

Before joining the faculty at JWU I was a Visiting Assistant Professor at Providence College and an adjunct professor at the University of Rhode Island.

I gained political experience as an American Political Science Association Congressional Fellow for Senator Sheldon Whitehouse in 2013-2014 and worked on education policy for the Senator.

Recent Publications

  • “Candidate vulnerability and exposure to counter-attitudinal information: Evidence from two US Presidential elections,” Communication Research, 2016. Authors: Dustin Carnahan, R. Garrett and Emily Lynch 
  • “Undermining the corrective effects of media-based political fact checking? The role of contextual cues and naïve theory,” Journal of Communication, 2013. Authors: R. Garrett, Erik Nisbet and Emily Lynch
  • “A turn toward avoidance? Selective exposure to online political information, 2004-08,” Political Behavior, 2011. Authors: R. Garrett, Dustin Carnahan and Emily Lynch